Cat Lovers Will Love The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

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I’m surprised The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021) hasn’t gotten more press — I’ve only found a few interviews with the principles behind this quirky little film, even though it’s funded by Amazon and showing in both theaters and on Amazon Prime. I guess it’s what 20 years ago would have been an art-house film or indie film, one of those under-the-radar flicks that may feature some big names and have high production values, but it’s not destined to make much money or get a ton of viewers. Which is a shame because this is an adorable movie, and I don’t think I’ve enjoyed anything this pure and charming all year or in who knows how long. With the caveat that you really have to be a cat person to appreciate it, and I am wholly and unreservedly!

I may love cats, but I’ve never much appreciated Benedict Cumberbatch on screen. He looks weird and his acting is stilted and affected. Well folks, that all works to his advantage here because the main character, which he plays, is definitely weird, stilted, and affected. Louis Wain (August 5, 1860 – July 4, 1939) was an English artist best-known, if at all, for drawings of animated and often anthropomorphized cats. He was the eldest of 6 children in a somewhat unusual middle-class family where his father was a textile merchant and his French mother designed church embroideries. When Louis was 20, his father died, and as the only remaining male in the family, Louis had to support his mother and sisters through his illustration work for London newspapers.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Cumberbatch as the artist.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

The two eldest Wain sisters & their mother.

In 1883, Louis married Emily Richardson, who had been governess for his youngest sisters. The couple only had five years together because she died of breast cancer. But during that time, they found a kitten that they named Peter. Louis drew pictures of Peter to amuse his ill wife, and she encouraged him to publish this art. In a diary entry, Louis wrote: “Peter was her [Emily’s] constant companion. His was the genius which gilded many a sorrowful hour and lightened many a burden.”

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Kitten Peter is played by Norbury Ackland, which is an adorable name for a cat, especially an actor cat.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Peter explores the stairs.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Encouraged by his people.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

The happy family! Young Peter is played by Windsor Wilde, another excellent cat name.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

THEY BUILD A SNOW CAT!!!

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Peter here is undoubtedly CGI, but it’s a very sweet image.

After Emily’s death, Louis began to get his cat art published, and it became wildly popular. He was hugely prolific, drawing hundreds of new cat designs every year starting around the turn of the last century. He illustrated over 200 books and a successful Christmas annual. It’s been suggested that Louis Wain’s cat art was the first thing to make cats popular as pets, but it’s also possible that he was just creating the right art at the right time. In the New York Post, historian Stephanie Howard-Smith said:

“The question of whether Wain helped to popularize the cat as a pet is also a bit of a chicken-or-the-egg problem. The cat’s star was on the rise in Victorian Britain — the first cat show was held in London in 1871 … In 1872, the dog food manufacturer James Spratt filed a patent to manufacture cat biscuits. [Cats began to] appear in popular pet memoirs … and in family photographs.”

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Louis starts drawing Peter when Emily is ill.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Tons of his cat drawings for his wife.

Unfortunately, all this popularity and sales of his art didn’t make Louis wealthy because he wasn’t a great businessperson. He had trouble supporting himself and paying his family’s debts despite how hard he worked. He was assisted by his friend and publisher Sir William Ingram, who allowed Louis, his mother, and his sisters to live in one of his seaside properties during the next two decades. With a modicum of stability, he kept drawing. Sir Frank Burnand, the editor of the satirical magazine Punch called Wain ‘The Hogarth of Cat Life,’ and Louis described one way he worked as:

“I take a sketch-book to a restaurant or other public place, and draw the people in their different positions as cats, getting as near to their human characteristics as possible. This gives me double nature, and these studies I think my best humorous work.”

In the early 20th century, Louis became paranoid, reclusive, and sometimes violent with his family, so his surviving sisters had him committed to a mental hospital in 1924. At the time, he was diagnosed with schizophrenia. It’s unclear what really was troubling Louis, since diagnosis and understanding of mental illness has changed a great deal in the past century. Previously, Wain’s more psychedelic cat artwork was used as “proof” of his “decline” into schizophrenia, but that’s been questioned because he drew both realistic and abstract cat art while he was institutionalized and many more of his artworks are undated.

After a year in the pauper’s hospital, a former acquaintance discovered Louis there and raised funds to get him moved to a better institution. Novelist H. G. Wells was part of this effort and said of Louis Wain:

“He has made the cat his own. He invented a cat style, a cat society, a whole cat world. English cats that do not look and live like Louis Wain cats are ashamed of themselves.”

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Nick Cave played H.G. Wells because he’s a longtime fan and collector of Louis Wain’s art.

Thanks to this late attention, the artist was able to live out his final years in more comfort in a private institution. Louis Wain died in 1939, having continued drawing cats all the time.

Much of this life story makes it into the film quite neatly. Sometimes biopics feel like they’re checking off the boxes of all the things that happened in a person’s life, and I suppose that’s more true when a person is highly accomplished or had a series of extreme events happen to them. Not a lot really happens to Louis Wain — he has to support his family, he gets married, his wife dies, he surrounds himself with cats, he draws cats, he’s bad with money, he has mental health issues. That’s not a very dramatic plot, and it doesn’t have to be for this subject matter. The movie is soft and introspective, an emotional portrait in many ways, musing on different types of love and connection and self-expression. Much like a cat itself, this movie curls up around you and kneads you with prickly paws, which you’ll either find endearing or irritating.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Adult Peter is played by Felix Wilde — a relation to Young Peter, I’m guessing. Also, I’m always amazed by cats who will take to a leash because I haven’t been able to do it with any of my cats.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Louis is speaking as Peter to Emily while she’s sick in bed. As someone who had breast cancer, I really felt this scene.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

When Louis’ art becomes popular, he escapes a crowd, with Peter in tow.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Peter calmly waits under the table for Louis at a book-signing.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

True comfort animal.

 The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Louis would rather have lunch with the cats than his sisters.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

I swear I did not have subtitles turned on, either time I watched this film, & yet THERE ARE SUBTITLES FOR THE CATS IN THIS SCENE. Adorbs.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

I like jomping!

In the background helping set the scene for this quirky tale are costumes designed by the always excellent Michael O’Connor. The one thing noteworthy is how much print and pattern is used in all the clothing, both men’s and women’s. It’s historically accurate and emphasizes the “electrical” buzz that’s a visual theme in the movie. The set designs are also filled with patterns, like wallpapers, leaves, and other textures.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Emily only has a few gowns, & they’re mostly blue print fabrics. This is an 1880s gown with ruching along the front.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Same gown in a behind-the-scenes shot, where you can see the side swags & tiered skirt.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Only for the theater scene does she wear this solid green gown — it’s a severe look for a dramatic turning point in the story.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Around the same time of Emily’s cancer diagnosis, they find Peter. She’s wearing another blue print bustle gown.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

In this side view, the stripe and dot patterns can be seen.

And mad props to O’Connor for correctly showing the passage of time through the clothing! The film starts in the 1880s with women in bustle gowns and then moves to the 1890s when the women wear leg-o-mutton sleeves. Next is the 1910s with slim silhouettes, and the movie closes out with a few 1920s cloches in view. Thank you, because it’s one of my pet peeves to see time march on in a story but not in the fashions.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

The oldest sister, Caroline (Andrea Riseborough), wears a severe but very smart 1890s suit around the time of Louis’ first big artistic success & corresponding financial failures.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Sister Josephine Wain (Sharon Rooney) also has a correct suit for the period, hers in stripes with a bit of trim.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Prints in Louis’ shirt, tie, & pocket square, at a cat show.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

At their seaside home, the sisters wear shirtwaist outfits. And even though their mother is in black, her shirt has a subtle print, while Caroline wears stripes.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Off to the beach.

The Electrical Life of Louis Wain (2021)

Crowds in the 1920s attend a Louis Wain fundraiser.

 

 

 

Do you love cats? Will you watch The Electrical Life of Louis Wain?

18 Responses

  1. MsNomi

    Allergic to cats. Big devotee of Cumberbatch. Small, introspective film; which the British are renowned for. No superheroes or mass murders, hence no big publicity. Absolutely adored it!

    Reply
  2. Laina

    “He looks weird and his acting is stilted and affected.” THANK YOU! I thought I was the only one who felt that way.

    Reply
  3. Constance

    He suited the character here. I enjoyed this movie, and have always loved cats. Peter was amazing.

    Reply
  4. Author Jennifer Quail

    I only saw it because it popped up as a suggestion on my Prime Video page, and I was not disappointed. Not least because I have at the moment both an older kitty doing poorly AND a new kitten who was a bit smaller than Baby Peter when she was found in my neighbor’s barn. I was primed for emotional cat movie.

    Reply
  5. Barbara van Zanten

    I am definitely NOT a cat person but I loved this film. I thought Benedict Cumberbatch’s performance was Oscar-worthy. His depiction of grief and the slide into madness was first class. The costumes, scenery, colors and acting were all excellent.

    Reply
  6. Frances Germeshausen

    Recommended to a cat-loving co-worker, who found the trailer and declared herself “obsessed.” We’re watching it now and it’s charming.

    Reply
  7. Lynne Connolly

    I avoided it because I didn’t see how it could be anything but deeply depressing, if they followed the real life of the man. Born into poverty, marrying a woman who died 3 years after the wedding, in financial straits all his life, and then committed to an asylum with schizophrenia. So I noped out.
    His art got progressively scarier, and finally, when he killed himself, they didn’t look like cats at all. And I’m not a fan of the anthropomorphic drawings he did.

    Reply
    • Mollie

      That’s what I’m thinking. I haven’t been able to watch a tearjerker movie or show since the pandemic hit because I don’t want any more bleakness in my life. And I looked up his art. I don’t know why but it deeply unsettles me.

      Reply
      • Trystan L. Bass

        I find his art incredibly charming & the ‘wallpaper’ cats are gorgeous, intricate, & sublime. The story showed how cats & art & art about cats gave his life meaning & brought joy to others, so the movie felt cathartic & uplifting to me.

        Reply
        • Mollie

          I can definitely see why his art was popular and the wallpaper cats are interesting. I love cats (have 3) and I was expecting to fully love his work. Brains are weird!

          Reply
  8. Charity

    I will probably try this at some point — I was super into the trailer, and then found out how depressing his life is, and worried people/cats might die, so I have avoided it thus far.

    Benedict was gorgeous in a wig in Amazing Grace, but whenever they leave his hair curly, it makes him so unattractive — it’s the contrast between curls (feminine) and his extremely masculine features. He’s the only actor I know who can be incredibly hot with his hair slicked back (Khan in Star Trek) and weird-looking the rest of the time.

    Reply
  9. ktkittentoes

    My bff, upon seeing the trailer for this movie, said, “Did they literally make this movie just for you?”
    At any rate, I finally, from this movie, have a label I’m willing to accept. I’m “an enthusiastic polyhobbyist.”

    Reply
  10. hsc

    Alas, no access to Amazon Prime, so not going to be something I’ll be able to watch.

    But I just read a glowing review on another site that mentioned that Wain’s mother is played by Phoebe (Sarah) Nicholls– who has a lengthy career in Frock Flicks on the large and small screen, starting as a child actress in WOMEN IN LOVE (1969, as the young sister Winifred) and including adult roles in BRIDESHEAD REVISITED (1981), THE MISSIONARY (1982), MAURICE (1987), PERSUASION (1995), FAIRY TALE: A TRUE STORY (1997, directed by her husband Charles Sturridge), DOCTOR THORNE (2016), among others.

    Reply

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