Outlander Costume Recap & Podcast: Season 2, Episode 3

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We’ll be recapping every episode of Outlander this season, both in blog post AND podcast. Kendra and Sarah will be focusing mostly on the costumes — designed by Terry Dresbach — in our blog posts, but probably tackling both the costumes and the story itself in our podcasts. You can find the podcast at the bottom of this post, or on iTunes!

For those who aren’t regular Frock Flicks readers: this blog and podcast is all about costumes in historical movies and TV shows, and we approach things from the angle of history. So, expect us to be talking about the costumes primarily from the point of view of comparison with the real history of the 1740s. We’ll also talk about costume in terms of story, and the deviations that come with this one having the fantasy element of time travel. But, know that when we talk about that dreaded phrase “historical accuracy,” we’re not doing it to be mean or judgy. It’s just one lens through which to watch this fabulous show.

We begin with Claire in her dressing gown…

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Full-length shot of the house coat from last episode, from behind. — Sarah
Love the center back pleats, reminiscent of the robe à la française. — Kendra

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Claire helps Jamie dress is a FABULOUS waistcoat! — Kendra

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THIS EMBROIDERY — Kendra

Claire goes to a card party with Paris BFF Louise de Rohan and shrinking English violet Mary Hawkins…

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Embroidered silk, ruches, elbow ruffles, bow choker! — Kendra

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Mary Hawkins is in a sweet, more demure gown — less froof, plus that cap is SO English. — Kendra

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Fly fringe! — Sarah

Claire is wearing a yellow silk/wool gown that looks very much like the nightgown, a style worn in England in this era (and which would later transition into the robe à l’anglaise). The silk satin (?) stomacher and petticoat were hand painted. It has a matching hooded cape.

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The back looks like it has some stitched down pleats, and parts of it are cut in one piece (ie bodice and skirt without waist seam), which is why it seems like an English nightgown. Love! — Kendra

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I didn’t notice the mitts before! — Sarah
I forgot to mention them on the podcast, but I was LOVING the matching mitts! — Kendra

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Tiny little black lace frill along the edges of the gown. It’s missing robings, a small pleated bit along the edges of the gown, but I’ll let it slide. — Kendra

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Claire mending a fichu. NOT in her element. — Kendra

Over at Versailles, Jamie is playing chess against Monsieur Duvernay, the French finance minister. He convinces him to meet with Bonnie Prince Charlie.

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That derpy little curl sticking out from behind his left ear… — Sarah

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Effing fabulous embroidery on the waistcoat. — Sarah

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Room porn!

Claire goes to Maitre Raymond’s to get a contraceptive for her lady’s maid, who is shagging Murtagh. She runs into the Comte St. Germain heading out as she’s heading in…

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I NEED DIS. — Sarah
YES YES YES — Kendra

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Still not entirely sure what is going on with his waistcoat… — Sarah
He’s an apothecary! His waistcoat is supposed to make him look all mystical! — Kendra

Claire heads to the charity hospital to volunteer her services…

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She’s wearing a lovely wine-colored wool (?) riding habit, which pairs beautifully with the blue cravat. That cravat is done very cheesily, with the ruffle bib, but this is a minor quibble. — Kendra

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Murtagh gets a spiffy linen frock coat. — Sarah

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Pinned on apron! Nice touch! — Sarah

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GUYS, SHE TASTES THE PEE. Yes, I know it’s because she suspects diabetes, but PEE. — Sarah

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Pretty sure those are vintage buttons on his coat. — Sarah
LOVE the trim that the buttons are attached to. Not 100% about the waistcoat fabric — it feels very clunky and upholestery section-y. Note Duvernay is in a more fashion-forward wig now that he’s not at court. — Kendra

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Bonnie Prince Charlie rocking the medium blue satin! — Kendra

Jamie is stressed. BPC is claiming that he has secret English financiers, and Duvernay promises French support. He heads home to consult with Claire, but she doesn’t turn up for HOURS. Jamie’s patriarchy gets sore.

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Finally, Jamie is wearing something snazzy! — Kendra

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Black silk satin! But his hair still isn’t looking great… — Kendra

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THIS WAISTCOAT. LOVED IT. — Kendra

Back at Madame Elise’s, there’s a great background scene where a prostitute is painted into a corset backwards…

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Jamie tracks down a young pickpocket who works at the brothel, naming him Fergus and enlisting his help to steal letters.

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Nicely tailored suit! — Sarah

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Wonder if there’s a subliminal message in the pansies? — Sarah

At the hospital, Claire wears a rose silk satin petticoat and bodice — she’s clearly taken off her outer layer to work.

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BOUTON IS A HELPER!!! — Kendra

With Mother Hildegarde’s help, Jamie and Claire crack the code in Prince Charlie’s letters. Back at home, Claire puts on a blue silk satin overgown that’s very much in the style of a posing gown.

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The way it swoops over the center front to close, but then opens above the bottom of the underbodice, is lovely. — Kendra

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Another cut-through back? I love that Claire is clearly wearing full hoops, not just pocket hoops, which give her skirts back fullness. — Kendra
Note to self: Get full panniers. I’ve never been happy with how the pocket hoops look under my gowns. — Sarah

 

 

We want to thank Outlander-Online.com for their awesome screenshots!

What did you think of this round of costumes?

Outlander Season Two, Episode Three, Podcast Recap

Listen to our podcast recap of the episode here or on iTunes!

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Three historical costumers who decided the world needed a podcast and blog dedicated to historical costume movies and everything right and wrong with them.

22 Responses

  1. Susan Pola

    Sometimes a pansy, embroidered or real, is just a pansy. *grins* Seriously, though I loved the episode. Wee Fergus is cute, but having survived in a brothel and the streets is tough. He has the ability to look like a starving boy, Claire doesknow it’s an act, but falls sorta anyway.

    Costumes were so gorgeous, especially the yellow dress and Louise’s gown.
    I want the DVD now so I can pause and photograph pics.

    Ms Dresbach posted Master Raymond’s coat on her blog. I like how there are subtle and sorta subtle cues to his interest on it. Maybe Geillis took these to heart. *even wider grin*.

    I agree I need a set of panniers. Wonder if I can buy them with a new corset with tax refund?

    Reply
  2. Lady Hermina De Pagan

    I ADORE that Banyan dressing gown. I have a Mantua Pattern for a similar garment and it was a horror of screams and tears trying to make one with the box pleating all lining up. I give Terry and her team TONS of credit getting that pattern correct. I adore that black weskit and coat Jamie is wearing. It makes me wish for an embroidery machine.

    Reply
  3. Ellira

    Ugh this episode was just so beautiful I couldn’t pay attention to the story. I loved the look of every single costume! Evidently I’ll have to watch it again just to make sure I got everything out of it. ;)

    Spoilers for folk who haven’t read the book … but I think Maitre Raymond is hinted at being a fellow “traveller”, which would explain his bizarre waistcoat.

    Reply
  4. Martina

    But did you like Jamie’s waistcoat? :). The embroiderer, Liz Boulton, does an amazing job. Everything is so beautiful.

    Reply
    • Lady Hermina De Pagan

      Sorry about the spelling. Apparently my smartphone autocorrect got drunk while I was typing. But yes the embroidery was mouth watering.

      Reply
  5. Susan Pola

    I’m in love, lust, with Jamie’s waistcoat. It’s truly a work of art.
    It’s truly a wonder that the embroiderer, Liz Boulton, doesn’t need a new eyeglass RX due to such close work.

    Reply
  6. decrepitelephone

    TOTALLY unrelated to anything here BUT: It’s funny that I was sitting here listening to the podcast while tatting with my abalone tatting shuttle from Laci’s and then y’all start talking about Laci’s and then I got to learn how to correctly pronounce the name of the store! Thank you for that!

    Reply
  7. AshleyOlivia

    The costumes this episode were exquisite! I think my favorites were the saffron gown and the blue silk satin overgown ensemble with the pink peeping out. I remember Frock Flicks pointing out the lack of robings on the saffron gown when we first saw images of season 2 costumes in the trailer, but I thought the lack of robings worked after hearing Terry’s thought process on adapting Claire’s costumes so that they express her unique viewpoint. It makes sense to me that Claire would say, “Ugh, no, too much frou frou, line the bodice with something simpler.”

    Word on the street is that shagging will recommence in the next episode (I mean, he found his “snake” at the end of this episode…), so hopefully Jamie’s hair will improve. I don’t think we will ever see him in a wig… I actually can’t remember him ever wearing a wig in the books; Diana usually describes his hair as being “in a formal queue” when he attends formal events. I predict they will cut it halfway through the season, if they are staying true to the books, which I’m very much looking forward to, because the length of Sam Heughan’s hair in the season 1 premiere was peak hotness.

    I did not notice that BP Charlie’s frock coat was embroidered with pansies! God, I pray that was intentional. Hilarious.

    Bouton is the best. There is a moment in the book where Jamie is trying to enter the hospital and Bouton is blocking the entrance. Claire overhears Jamie attempting to “reason” with Bouton and he says, “Think it over, laddie, I’m a damn sight bigger than you. I wouldna undertake any rash ventures, if I were you… Faster, too… I don’t have to put up wi’ this, ye ken.” I wish they would have included it; Jamie’s sense of humor is one of the traits that makes him so attractive and sometimes I feel like the show writers don’t get it.

    Thanks for the post and podcast!

    Reply
  8. ladylavinia1932

    How did Jamie and Claire afford such an extensive wardrobe so quickly after leaving Scotland with barely anything? The wine merchant cousin?

    Is this the episode in which Claire tasted a patient’s urine?

    Reply
  9. ctrent29

    How can anyone like this show? Frankly, I’m not that impressed by the writing. And it’s going to get worse as more novels are adapted.

    Reply
    • Kendra

      Well you’re angry that we picked on the costumes in our top 10 1980s TV movies post because we didn’t take into account the whole production, but now you’re irritated that some of us like this show despite what you feel is bad writing? And, YMMV kind of applies to life in general.

      Reply
  10. Mary of Richfield

    I’ve been following your blog for a year or so and love it. When I was in grade school my mother made me a very lovely Marie Antoinette costume for Halloween. Even though I would say things like, “Off with their heads” and “Let them eat cake,” I was mistaken for Martha Washington. Don’t you people see I’m not wearing a fichu? Don’t you see I’m not an old lady? Meanwhile, I never knew the shoe boxes she used underneath to give the dress that distinct elongated shape were called pocket hoops! Thanks for a great and informative blog. Costume dramas are my favorite.

    Reply
    • Kendra

      Pfff, heathens who don’t know the difference between Marie Antoinette and Martha Washington! Glad you’ve found us!

      Reply
  11. Beth

    The name of the flower pansy in French is ‘pensée’, which roughly translates to thoughts. While the white rose was symbolic of the Stuart king “over the water,” this ensemble could be a visual cue to keep the Stuart cause in the thoughts of their loyalists. “Pensez en moi” – think of me.

    Reply

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