MCM: Richard E. Grant

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Today we savor the lengthy list of period films featuring Richard E. Grant. Known for his versatility, playing everything from comedic roles to snarling villains to tragic heroes, there’s pretty much something for everyone in his repertoire!

 

Mountains of the Moon (1990)

 

Henry & June (1990)

 

Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992)

 

The Age of Innocence (1993)

 

Hard Times (1994)

 

The Portrait of a Lady (1996)

 

Twelfth Night or What You Will (1996)

 

Keep the Aspidistra Flying (1997)

 

The Serpent’s Kiss (1997)

 

A Royal Scandal (1997)

1997 A Royal Scandal

 

St. Ives (1998)

 

A Christmas Carol (1999)

 

The Scarlet Pimpernel (1999-2000)

 

Gosford Park (2001)

 

Sherlock (2002)

 

The Hound of the Baskervilles (2002)

 

Monsieur N. (2003)

 

Bright Young Things (2003)

 

The Crimson Petal and the White (2011)

 

Queen & Country (2014)

 

Downton Abbey (2014)

 

Jekyll & Hyde (2015)

 

Their Finest (2016)

 

Got a favorite Richard E. Grant film? Share it with us in the comments!

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About the author

Sarah Lorraine

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Sarah discovered her dual passion for history and costume right around the age of twelve. Dragged kicking and screaming to her first Renaissance Faire at Black Point, she was convinced she was going to hate it, but to her surprise, she fell head over heels in love with the world of reenactment and dress up immediately. Her undergraduate degree is in Clothing & Textile Design, and she has a Master's in Art History and Visual Culture. When she’s not hauling crap to SCA events and ren faires, Sarah enjoys reading true crime books, writing fiction, and sewing historical clothing from the Middle Ages through the 20th-century. One of these days, she might even start updating her old costuming blog again.

22 Responses

  1. thedementedfairy

    Love him to bits, another velvet-voiced blue eyed charmer. [And of course, not in your remit here, but WARLOCK! Eeek! Such a fun film] Doesn’t Withnail and I squeak in under the post? Not that it’s very costume worthy, but still hilarious.

    Reply
    • Daniel Milford-Cottam

      I SO wanted a Withnail coat after seeing that film when I was 16! I think it does technically squeak in as it’s set in 1969, but I’m OK with it being absent – even if it is pretty hilarious. (And Paul McGann as Marwood/I made me realise I had a yen for men….)

      Reply
      • thedementedfairy

        He was exquisite in that wasn’t he, all eyes and lips, gorgeous. And dumb lol. Everyone wanted a Withnail coat, even the girls. I have always seen the sweariness as a Platonic ideal, and anyone who knows me would agree …

        Reply
    • Shirley

      I had to add to the Withnail and I love. I always tell people my favorite Hamlet on film is actually Richard E. Grant at the end of Withnail and I. Just heartbreaking.

      Reply
    • Sarah Lorraine

      Pretty sure Withnail and I takes place right about at our cut-off, 1969-1970 give or take. I did debate adding it because it’s one of his most iconic roles, but the costumes just aren’t “costume-y” enough to warrant it for this website.

      Reply
  2. Daniel Milford-Cottam

    I actually saw him a couple times when I was living in London, when we were commuting in on the same Underground trains. Both times he was giving up his seat for old ladies. Kinda d’awwwww….

    Reply
  3. Susan Pola Staples

    My favourite hero role is Sir Percy Blakeney in the Scarlet Pimpernel. My favourite heel is his Simon Bricker in Downton Abbey. My favourite villain of ambiguous sexual orientation is his role of Larry Oliphant in Mountains of the Moon.

    Reply
  4. Charity

    Much as I loathed that Hound of the Baskervilles adaptation all around for making Holmes a druggie, it was also one of the worst instances of mistyping that I have ever seen. Grant should have played Holmes and not Stapleton for obvious reasons (appearance, gravity, height, and general skill).

    Reply
  5. Sam Marchiony

    My favorite technically isn’t a frock flick, but a movie called First Night, where he plays a businessman who decides he wants to put together a production of Cosi Fan Tutte at his country estate mostly so he can flirt with the conductor.
    But there are some very pretty 18th century costumes in it for the opera sections (though I cringe at the girl not wearing a chemise beneath her stays).

    Reply
  6. Kelly

    He is perfection as Sir Andrew in Twelfth Night; check him as Kafka in the short film, Franz Kafka’s It’s a Wonderful Life; and he totally kills as Sir Percy. “Just a cravat?!? Sir, the cravat is the apotheosis of neckwear!” He adds a luster to everything he’s in.

    Reply
  7. MrsC (Maryanne)

    You missed the funnest!! Let Them Eat Cake was a TV series starring French and Saunders set in Versailles and it is so funny. REG did a star turn as Marquis de Sade who kept escaping from captivity and making nocturnal visits to ladies of the court. Nonsense but fun.

    Reply
  8. Lexi

    His charm, for me, always lied in his ability to make me feel like he, the performer and myself, the audience, were both involved in something elicit- a lot. If you have a chance to track down “Frank Kafka’s It’s a Wonderful Life”, I highly recommend it. I saw it as a wee lass at an Academy Nominee screening at our local library and loved it!

    Reply
  9. Karin

    I’ll watch him in anything! He’s also a very funny writer… check out his novel “By Design” and the one he wrote about making the film based on his childhood in southern Africa.

    Reply
  10. Lily Lotus Rose

    Oh, boy! In the last two weeks I have really found my niche of the Internet in finding this site… you love the expected loves of James Purefoy (MY boyfriend), Daniel Day Lewis, and Rufus Sewell… but to have the unexpected pleasure of an obscure (to many) and wonderful actor–Richard E. Grant…well, I’ve found my home.

    I’ve been a fan since his Warlock days! And like many others, I wish Whithnail and I could’ve been included in this post. I cannot even begin to articulate my feelings for Bram Stoker’s Dracula…. (sighs!)

    Reply

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