Frock Flicks Free-for-All June

42

You asked for it, so here’s an occasional open thread to bitch about anything tangentially related to history, costume, movies, or TV shows! Or whatever else is on your mind right now. Note that URLs are automatically held for moderation, but most anything else goes as long as you’re not bitchier than we are!

Summertime, and the living is easy — or is it? Well, our two big recaps are winding down, and typically summer theatrical releases are comic book stuff, not frock flick-y. Maybe we can catch up on our Netflix and Amazon queues! Or maybe we’ll just take a break, it’s been a slog this year for some of us…

RuPaul, Max "Status Update: Dead"

 

What’s on deck for your summer?

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Three historical costumers who decided the world needed a podcast and blog dedicated to historical costume movies and everything right and wrong with them.

42 Responses

  1. Saraquill

    You know you’re a historical fashion geek when:

    -Your nose regularly fogs museum display glass.
    -When asked about your favorite designers, you mention someone long deceased (in my case, Schiaparelli)

    Anyone else care to contribute?

    Reply
        • Frannie Germeshausen

          OK, we were at the fashion museum at Kent State (yeah, 4 dead in, that Kent State), and there was a White Dress exhibit. Starting with Chemise a la Reine through Regency, etc., The information mentioned the Morocco red slippers with one gown. Well, the only way to see those was to . . . lie down. Yep, got Steven to do it, too. Just them, Docent walked in with tour. We explained. She was cool with it. Probably reported us to security . . .

          Reply
          • Sarah F

            Planning a vacation around museums? Yup- Went to England earlier this month, and convinced my boyfriend to drive from London to Yorkshire and spend two nights in Haworth so I could visit the Bronte Parsonage.
            People listening to you at the museum? Yuuuuuuuup. See above.

            Reply
            • Trystan L. Bass

              I’ve been to the Parsonage twice, but it was before To Walk Invisible came out, & now Tom Pye says all his costumes are there, so I want to go back. sigh

              Reply
  2. Susan Pola Staples

    My favourites are Charles Frederick Worth and Jean-Phillipe Worth, Callot Soeurs, Jacques Doucet, Jeanne Paquin, Jeanne Hallee and Jeanne Lanvin with a smattering of Paul Poiret.

    All of you deserve a vacation, so be selfish and take it.

    Pet peeve: poorly researched frock flicks. I mean how hard is it to browse through the MMA on line collection as well as other museum and get a basic survey history book or bio.

    Reply
    • Trystan L. Bass

      I planned a week of blog repeats around July 4th. Did that last year & I’m just making it an annual thing. We only take major American holidays off, plus one week in summer & the week between xmas & new years. Bec. I am a cruel editor-in-chief, LOL!

      Reply
    • Roxana

      Oh I just adore Fortuny, those lovely deplos gowns! He makes Worth designs look over decorated.

      Reply
  3. Sam Marchiony

    I got a kick out of Good Omens — my eye is still relatively untrained but it looked like all the historical costumes in that were pretty solid— Crowley’s demon-eye-hiding sunglasses aside, but he needs those.

    Reply
    • Trystan L. Bass

      I’m hoping to watch that one on my summer ‘break’ from Frock Flicks! My recent non-historical break was Chernobyl, which is technically historical but I was alive & it’s totally NOT costumey. But highly recommended.

      Reply
  4. Kersten

    Yeah I think I’m going to be watching all those BBC Shakespeare plays from the seventies on Amazon. There’s some great actors in those. And looking up Sophie Rundle from Gentleman Jack (Ann Walker) and sleeping. Sleep is the best staycation activity! Also visiting/volunteering at our local botanic gardens. Second all the love for planning holidays around museum visits.

    Reply
  5. Saraquill

    I plan on doing a crap ton of studying in the name of getting this gorram degree finished. Not exciting, but tangentially Frock Flick related. I’m becoming That Person who complains about jewelry inaccuracy.

    Reply
  6. Lady Hermina De Pagan

    I am eagerly waiting for the closing date on my new house and planning the sewing room I’m going to design. I’m looking for an excellent sewing table with drawers. Though I might get a workshop workbench from harbor freight with a build in task lighting and tool drawers to catalog patterns and store my pins, thread and needles.

    Reply
    • Kersten

      That sounds amazing! Wish I had the space but I am putting in a folding sewing table.

      Reply
  7. Dayna W

    You have ruined me even for illustrations in books. I was helping in my son’s elementary school library and I spotted a biography of Betsy Ross. In all of the illustrations, the women are dressed like Puritans. So in addition with the liberties taken with history, they add liberties taken with historical dress. It’s annoying because it’s a drawing- the artist could actually make it look right without worrying about a budget!

    Reply
  8. Janet Nickerson

    You know you’re a historical fashion geek when you set off an alarm when trying to see the back of a garment on display at a museum.

    Reply
  9. Brandy Loutherback

    Anybody else see Alta Mar or High Seas? Did the hair bother anyone else?

    Reply
    • Lily Lotus Rose

      Brandy, so far I’ve only seen the first two episodes of Alta Mar. I didn’t notice the hair because I was too busy drooling over Jon Kortajarena.

      Reply
  10. MrsC (Maryanne)

    Binge watching some of Gentleman Jack tomorrow with a friend. It’s fecking freezing down here in Southern Hemisphere winterland, thank you!

    Reply
    • MrsC (Maryanne)

      We watched the first three episodes. Fascinating use of colour palettes and cuts but OMG are the sleeves really meant to look like they’re pulling the neckline off the shoulders of all the dresses? SO ANNOYING

      Reply
  11. Zuzana

    Hi! I’ve been reading your blog for a long time and I love it! Few days ago I found this detective(?) spanish series Alta mar. it’s set after the WWII on ship. Just wondering if you could write a review on that? I enjoy the evening gowns the most, because they are so elegant. But also, everything in that show reminds me of Titanic – even the main actress looks like Kate Winslet to me haha

    Reply
  12. Saraquill

    I finally remember what I wanted to add to the Free for All! Jessica Kellgren-Fozard, a history buff on YouTube, has a video up on Gentleman Jack and her many romances.

    It’s at https ://youtu. be/q46K0xwg0I0 (without the spaces)

    Reply
  13. Yanina

    Series-wise, I plan to watch Chernobyl, as it feels quite close home (and couple of our friends were engaged in after-Chernobyl mess onsite). Not sure I could finish it though. Also, I’ve been planning to watch The Long Song, and a couple of our historical TV series from nineties. Hardly expect any historical accuracies in costumes, as they were made on zero budget, but who knows.
    Just yesterday been to a small local museum where they have embroidered shirts from end of 19th century on display. Luckily for me, no glass cabinets, so I stuck my nose right into them.

    Reply
    • Trystan L. Bass

      The 2nd & 4th eps of Chernobyl are particularly hard to watch, trauma-wise, but the story is so well crafted & well researched. There’s also a podcast just called The Chernobyl Podcast that has the show’s creator talking about how they made the series & what’s accurate & what’s not (most is).

      Reply
      • Yanina

        Thank you! Need to check the podcast too. For the everyday details, from what I’ve seen on the promo pics, almost everything is authentic (like Ulana is sitting at the table with glass panel on it – hell, we still have those in small towns).

        Reply
  14. Lillian

    So the travesty that is the Spanish Princess has got me thinking: what we really need is a show about al-Andalus. It’s an part of history that isn’t really shown on screen much, but I think it could be really interesting.

    Reply
  15. Rori

    Amazons has LOTR and Wheel of Time; Netflix with The Witchers and Stranger Things, HBO with Westworld, Chernobyl, and the GoT prequels.

    With GoT has ended and Vikings ending soon, it seems Starz need to step up in the competition (yes i’m salty about them renewing the Spanish Princess :| ).

    Reply
  16. Amari Greenwood

    It amazes me how people will try and say “oh there’s no original ideas for historcal dramas, theyre all the same blah blah”

    a Harlem renaissance based historical drama, and honestly it really would be popular. Plus no one ever looks at 1920s day dresses yes I know they’re not as iconic as flapper outfits, but they’re still equally pretty and charming! Plus I’m dying to see my favorite AA authors come to life and the rich history and culture that stems from the Harlem renaissance as well as looking at the rising Chinatowns and various Chinese immigrants that came in creating a whole new culture in America

    Or maybe a drama series set in new Orleans or the West indies during the 1820s-1830s exploring the history and interesting social and racial class right before antebellum era peaks. Say what you will about 1830s fashion, but you can deny just how powerful and political statement it was, especially with the “Tigon laws” and later apron laws passed. It would make for an amazing and powerful historical drama

    Reply
    • Yanina

      I would second for the 1830s New Orleans drama! And all they need to do is adapt Barbara Hambly’s historical detective novels, A Free Man of Color. I would love to see Ariyon Bakare (Stephen Black in Jonatthan Strange and Mr. Norrell) in the main role.

      Reply
  17. Johanna

    Just came off seeing the series I think is called “Maximilian and Mary of Burgund” in English. It was refreshing seeing a series where they don’t speak English, and it’s not about the Tudors even if it’s the 15th century. Also it might be that The Spanish Princess has killed my critical eye, but the costums weren’t too bad. Except for the men refusing to wear hose with cod pieces and some strange back openings on the dresses, the main ladies even managed to have their hair up in most scenes. Of course they didn’t cover their hair, but at least it wasn’t all free flowing tresses.

    Reply

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