Just How Bad Is The Devil’s Violinist?

15

The Devil’s Violinist (2013) had a lot of things going for it: Bernard Rose (of Immortal Beloved fame) wrote and directed it; it starred a really really ridiculously good-looking guy who was an actual violinist, so at least the musical bits wouldn’t look fake; and it had Joely Richardson playing a kind of Cockney George Sand, which is what got my attention in the first place. That said, it got horribly panned when it was released. Kendra and Trystan even briefly mocked it in one of our bad movies and TV snippets, deeming it not worthy of their time. Well, dear readers, I am not so easily scared off. I was hoping that the comparison to Immortal Beloved was being unjustly unfair because, face it, Immortal Beloved is a phenomenal film — but, nope, The Devil’s Violinist really truly sucks.

The plot focuses on Niccolo Paganini, the great violinist of the early 19th century, and is driven by a highly fanciful take on the rumors that he had struck a deal with the devil in order to achieve fame and fortune. That Paganini was devastatingly handsome and one of the rock stars of his age is indisputable, and the casting of the very pretty David Garrett, real-life virtuoso violinist and something of a pop star himself, looked good on paper, I’m sure. However, the reality is that Garrett cannot act his way out of a wet paper bag. Whatever sex appeal he has is subverted entirely by his forced and wooden acting, so you’re not even able to enjoy the eye candy because you can’t stop focusing on how awful he is. Even when he’s just sitting there saying nothing. Seriously, I’ve never seen anyone be able to suck at just sitting there quite like David Garrett. The rest of the cast can’t breathe life into the plot with Garrett sucking it out again and again, so everyone is forced to overcompensate, creating a remarkable feedback loop of scene chewing.

Devils-Violinist-18

This acting thing is hard work.

The one actor that manages to somehow rise above it is Andrea Deck, who plays Paganini’s love interest and the daughter of his promoter. Give that girl a medal for triumphing in the face of insurmountable odds, because not even veteran Joely Richardson could manage it. That Cockney George Sand? Cringingly bad all the way around. Richardson looks like someone roughed up Rita Skeeter in a back alley and forced her to wear hobo clothes. It’s already a stretch to believe that a woman would be a beat reporter for The Times in the 1830s, but the suspension of disbelief is totally destroyed by having her character run around looking like a cosplaying chimney sweep who got lost on the way to a Mary Poppins convention. And her accent is about as bad as Dick Van Dyke’s, just to add insult to injury.

Devils-Violinist-09

Something something cockney accent oi u wot m8?

Costumes in The Devil’s Violinist

So, now that we’ve established how bad the film is, what about the costumes? Surely, Bernard Rose would have nothing less than amazing costumes in his follow-up to the impeccably costumed Immortal Beloved, right? Wrong. Austrian costumer Birgit Hutter (Houdini) manages to just miss the mark. There’s a lot of “well, it’s close enough,” especially with the corsets that feature heavily throughout the film as Paganini sleeps his way through a vast array of prostitutes. In any given whorehouse scene, there are 1830s style corsets are shown next to 1890s style corsets — and there are a lot of whorehouse scenes. I wouldn’t go as far as to say the costumes sucked, and to be honest, if the plot and the acting were better, I would have probably gone much softer on the costuming … Instead, it’s just the disappointing icing on a crap cake.

Devils-Violinist-09

Don’t care; tits out.

Charlotte’s peach opera gown is the one noteworthy costume in the entire film. It looked so familiar that I went trawling the internet for far longer than I should have trying to see if it was recycled from another movie. My conclusion is that it reminds me a lot of something Emma Thompson would have worn in Impromptu, and that’s what was pinging on my radar.

Devils-Violinist-04

The best parts of the film are when Garrett is performing. At least he’s not torturing any dialogue.

The theme for Paganini is “tortured artist.” At one point there’s a scene that full on reminded me of Michael Jackson’s face mask-wearing phase, but because of the annoying shaky-cam style filmography (WHY, BERNARD, WHY), I couldn’t get a screengrab of it. He slouches around and wears black a lot and apparently doesn’t believe in shaving his neck or brushing his hair. The overall effect isn’t sexy, it’s just skeezy.

Devils-Violinist-02

He looks like he reeks of flop sweat.

Christian McKay plays Charlotte’s father, John, who is a conductor/promoter at one of London’s opera houses. He concocts the harebrained idea to lure Paganini to London and bankrupts himself in the process. About all I can say is I would have preferred a more fitted silhouette at this point in the 19th century as far as his costumes go.

Devils-Violinist-17

You can tell by the way I walk I’m a woman’s man no time to talk.

Veronica Ferres is Charlotte’s step-mother, Elizabeth, who is herself a former (?) opera singer, who ran off with Charlotte’s dad. Elizabeth is initially set up as though she’s going to be Charlotte’s antagonist and main competitor for Paganini’s affections (even explicitly telling John that she would leave him in a heartbeat for Paganini), but in the end, she’s sort of lamely encouraging of Charlotte’s talent. After Charlotte is caught in a vicious scheme to discredit her in the press to teach Paganini a lesson, it’s Elizabeth who suggests that Charlotte capitalize on her new-found infamy and hit the European tour circuit.

TDV_Deck_Ferres_Int_House_Watson-1.tif

This is pretty much her only outfit the entire film, aside from a barely seen evening gown. Also, wtf is it with these women and their lack of petticoats???

Which, of course, Charlotte does, while Paganini suffers the effects of syphilis and drug addiction alone and miserable in Paris. She refuses to see him again and quite wisely ends up cutting off all contact with him. We see her moving to America and crushing it on stage singing the aria Paganini wrote and asked her to perform. Her costume, hair, and makeup are cringingly bad because America, I guess.

Devils-Violinist-15

I think I wore that dress in a photo I had taken at the Olde Timey picture studio in Old Sacramento as a kid.

Olivia d’Abo plays tertiary character Primrose Blackstone, the pinch-lipped leader of a band of feminists who follow Paganini around London, protesting his sinful ways. She looks appropriately irritating in her large black bonnet and stringy blonde hair.

Devils-Violinist-10

Who said feminism can’t be sexy? Primrose, that’s who.

And here’s Eliza Doolittle Ethel Langham in her only other outfit:

Devils-Violinist-12

Loverly.

Jared Harris plays Urbani, Paganini’s manager/probably demonic overlord. He scene chews the worst out of everyone, doing all but swirl his cape and if he had one, twirl his mustache at every turn while wearing a ridiculously tall top hat.

Devils-Violinist-16

Rehearsing for the big gig in a cemetery. Doesn’t everyone do that?

The Devil’s Violinist could have benefitted from so many changes, that it would probably end up being a different movie all together had at any point someone taken Bernard Rose aside and questioned whether it was a really good idea to allow poor, hapless David Garrett to follow in Gary Oldman’s venerable steps. No one can avoid comparing this film to Immortal Beloved, because it had so much banked on that association from the get-go. Rose should have known that the best course of action would have been to find an actor, not a musician, to play the lead, and it all went to shit from there.

In conclusion, I suggest watching The Devil’s Violinist while moderately tipsy. Maybe not full-on drunk, but definitely have a decent buzz going. It’ll help, trust me.

 

Tags

About the author

Sarah Lorraine

Website

Sarah discovered her dual passion for history and costume right around the age of twelve. Dragged kicking and screaming to her first Renaissance Faire at Black Point, she was convinced she was going to hate it, but to her surprise, she fell head over heels in love with the world of reenactment and dress up immediately. Her undergraduate degree is in Clothing & Textile Design, and she has a Master's in Art History and Visual Culture. When she’s not hauling crap to SCA events and ren faires, Sarah enjoys reading true crime books, writing fiction, and sewing historical clothing from the Middle Ages through the 20th-century. One of these days, she might even start updating her old costuming blog again.

15 Responses

  1. Trystan L. Bass

    I TOLD YOU IT WAS BAD!!!

    So I tried to watch this twice. I fell asleep both times, it was so bad / boring / stupid / pointless. The stringy hair. The lame costumes. The inane plot. The terrible acting. I figured if it couldn’t keep me awake enough to snark it, then I was sticking it into the one-line review territory.

    Reply
  2. mishkagora

    If you have a look at pictures of Paganini, you’ll see that he wasn’t swarthy like Garrett. They would have been better off casting Richard Armitage (who does bear a resemblance and has a proven ability to pull off historically-accurate bushy sideburns) and engaging Garrett to do close-ups for the actual performance scenes (filmed from behind and focussed on the violin).

    Reply
    • MoHub

      The sideburns in the movie aren’t nearly as opulent as the ones Paganini actually sported. Once again, historical accuracy was sacrificed to fit modern tastes.

      Reply
  3. drush76

    And her accent is about as bad as Dick Van Dyke’s, just to add insult to injury.

    Bradley Whitford’s take on a Cockney accent in “SAVING MR. BANKS” made Dick Van Dyke seem like a native of East London.

    Reply
    • Aria Clements of Aria Couture

      I can forgive Dick Van Dyke since his character was an amalgamation of several others and meant to be just plain silly. This movie, however, is playing it straight. I sentence it to a night in the Forbidden Forest.

      Reply
  4. Rike

    I haven’t seen the devil’s violinist but I remember the very obnoxious German add campaign. It included Garrett promoting a strange and pretty modern looking jewlery Thomas Sabo jewlery collection https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rjCbNHvvMf8 called rebel at heart. I don’t know if that is true, but to me the entire add campaign for the movie was centered around Garrett’s image. I never got the impression that the movie wanted to tell Paganini’s story. It seemed all centered around Garrett.

    Reply
  5. SarahV

    Nothing substantive say other than “Primrose Blackstone” is one of the most awesome character names EVER!>>!>

    I feel like she would be the Alpha Female of Slytherin who would coldcock Millicent Bullstrode, poison Pansy Parkinson and make a play for Lucius Malfoy while Narcissa watched impotently.

    Reply
  6. Aria Clements of Aria Couture

    I laughed so hard at this review. I’m watching this movie right now, literally RIGHT NOW, and had to look up some reviews to see if it’s just me. He’s HAWT as FUUUUUCK, but wow, his acting! As long as he keeps his mouth shut, I can enjoy the eye candy. All in all, this movie is so bad that it’s unintentional comedy, and for that, I intend to watch this movie again, even though the costuming is giving me a brain-ache. It’s definitely so bad it’s funny.

    Reply
  7. Emily

    Seriously, I don’t get why it has received so much hate. Sure, David Garrett isn’t an actor, but I’ve seen movies with greater fame that had worse acting. The only “bad” thing that really jumped out at me was the very obvious green screen in the harbor scenes, but that isn’t even what people are complaining about. I liked it. They accurately depicted a real composer, and I give them serious props because if you know classical composers like I do, you see all of the little tidbit references to their real life events. Like when Ubani cast the shadow of the devil behind Paganini at the concert? That really happened and classical artists like myself appreciate that. We don’t get a lot of representation in the mainstream.

    Reply

Feel the love

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.